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A senior view of Mitt Romney… this is a pretty complete statement in poetic form.

 

Here’s a 92-Year-Old Veteran’s Must See Poetic Deconstruction of Mitt Romney. I’ll put the complete poem below the video so you can share it with friends.

Mr. Maxwell is a very impressive guy, and he sticks a pin in the Romney balloon that promotes the Republican as having support of the elderly. He doesn’t

 

Ralph Maxwell

WHEREFORE ART THOU, MITT ROMNEY?
by Ralph Maxwell

O, Romney-O, Romney-O,
Wherefore art thou, Mitt Romney?
You flip-flop here, you flip-flop there,
You flip-flop almost ev’rywhere.

You ballyhoo what you’re gonna do
And then you pull a switcheroo;
You now malign what you once found fine;
Seems like you’ve got a jellyfish spine.

Obamacare, by you begun,
Now you’d trash it on day one.
Gun control you did extol,
But now you’re preaching decontrol.

O, Romney-O, Romney-O,
Wherefore art thou, Mitt Romney?
We’ve got no clue what you will do
Or what new view you’ll pander to.

Time was you championed women’s choice,
But you no longer heed their voice;
On gay rights, too, guess you withdrew
Support they once enjoyed from you.

Global warming, EPA,
Immigration, minimum pay,
Roe V. Wade, also fair trade,
All joined your flip-flop cavalcade.

O, Romney-O, Romney-O
Wherefore art thou, Mitt Romney?
So many things that you were for
You’ve turned against and slammed the door.

Stimulus and cap and trade,
Education, foreign aid,
Campaign reform, tarp rescues, too,
All victims of your switcheroo.

You take your stand on shifting sand,
We never know where you will land;
You vacillate, you fabricate,
A wishy-washy candidate.

O, Romney-O, Romney-O,
Wherefore art thou Mitt Romney?
As gov’nor you let taxes rise,
Now ev’ry tax you demonize.

You say regardless of the facts
You’d take an axe to millionaire’s tax;
You’d feed the greed of the richest few
The poor and middle class you’d screw.

Your tax returns you hide from view
What evil there lurks we’ve no clue;
If they’re not bad why hesitate?
Or is it they incriminate?

O, Romney-O, Romney-O,
Wherefore art thou Mitt Romney?
At Bain you plundered with a flair
And walked away a zillionaire.

You shipped off-shore, good jobs galore
To China, India, Singapore;
A job creator you are not
And to boast you are is tommyrot.

As a total fraud, Mitt’s got no peer
What we should do is crystal clear:
Let’s give Obama four more years!
Yes, it’s Obama — four more years!
FOUR MORE YEARS! FOUR MORE YEARS!

 

A salute to Ronald Searle who has died at Age 91…

Nigel Molesworth

As a young teenager I became a regular reader of Ronald Searle‘s wonderful illustrated books about Nigel Molesworth (especially Down With Skool!) and the other British schoolboys at St. Custards and the schoolgirls of St. Trinians who turned up in comic films as well.

From the London Telegraph:

…behind the humorist illustrator was a man of much darker vision who could find sharp things to say about global poverty, paedophilia or the war on terror, and could plumb the depths of an almost Boschian disgust with the cruelties and excesses of his fellow man — as seen for example in a sketch entitled In Fashion, featuring maimed and wailing women walking down a catwalk. In this more Swiftian guise, Searle was credited with influencing many leading artists and illustrators, including Gerald Scarfe .

Much of Searle’s work was profoundly influenced by his experiences during the war. As he himself often explained, his experience of the “horror, the misery, the blackness” of a Japanese prisoner of war camp had “changed the attitude to all things, including humour”.

Ronald Searle

British illustrator Ronald Searle went to art school in Cambridge and during WWII was working as a draftsman with the Brisits Army and Singapore. His unity was captured by the Japanese and spent 3 and a half years as a prisoner, unltimately ending up as a slave laborer in 1943 on the Burma Railway.

…he rejected what he called the “jolly good chaps” account given in David Lean’s film Bridge on the River Kwai for providing a false picture of camaraderie in the face of adversity. Searle had been sent to work on the railway in 1943 after he and two other inmates had begun producing a magazine to boost the morale of the prisoners. “It upset the extremely conservative mentalities of our own administration — the commanders and the chaplains,” he recalled with some bitterness. “When the time came for the Japanese to say we want groups to be sent up north, the English chose the troublemakers.” For Searle, the bridge remained the place “where I lost all my friends”.

Searle was also known for posters, animations and other illustrations. The opening credit animation for Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines was Searle’s work.