Blog Archives

Dorothy McGuire, of the McGuire Sisters, Dies at 84

 

Dorothy McGuire (center) and her sisters

Dorothy McGuire and her sisters, Christine (the oldest) and Phyllis (the youngest and the lead singer), became pop stars at roughly the same time that rock ’n’ roll was becoming a worldwide phenomenon. The McGuire Sisters’ music existed in a kind of parallel universe to R&R — like that of Perry Como, Patti Page and others.

Their most memorable hits were “Sincerely” and “Sugartime” (both of which reached No. 1).  The sisters’ genteel image — identical clothes, identical hairstyles, etc., were an image that stood up well on shows like Ed Sullivan.

The McGuire Sisters’ their first public performances were in their mother’s church. In 1952, after touring veterans’ hospitals and military bases and performing at a hotel in Dayton, they decided to try their luck in New York. Their success was almost immediate. They became regulars on Arthur Godfrey’s hugely popular morning television show, where they remained for six years, and began recording for Coral Records, a subsidiary of Decca.

They had their first Top 10 record, “Good Night, Sweetheart, Goodnight,” in 1954.

The cause of death was complications of Parkinson’s disease, according to her son Rex Williamson.

 

Quote of the Day: Michael J. Fox on Rush Limbaugh

Interviewed on the tube last night, Michael J. Fox commented on Rush Limbaugh‘s attacks on women (and reminded everyone that it was Limbaugh who declared Fox’s Parkinson’s Disease a fake):

“But the thing with Sandra Fluke, I am husband to a wife and a father to daughters, and a son to a mother, and a brother to sisters, and that was really offensive… I can yell and scream and wave my arms, ironically, or whatever about what he said, but let the free market decide, and all the things. I love there to be voices out there that I don’t agree with. I love people to say vile offensive things, because then I know who they are, and as a voter I know they are, and as a consumer, I know who they are, and then they have identified themselves, and all things being equal, the market will balance that out.

You know there’s this talk about Bill Maher. The difference with Bill Maher is that he is on HBO, and he doesn’t have advertisers. He was once in the public sector and made statements and advertisers bailed on him, and he was relegated to cable. So now, I find it much less egregious in a way, not the content of what he says, it may be offensive, but it’s a different thing than this giant corporate supported bully pulpit that this man has, and the way again, he did the same thing with Sandra Fluke that he did with me, but as I said more egregious I think with Sandra Fluke, because here was a private citizen expressing an opinion that she has a right to express that was sought out by people we’ve elected to represent the point of view the public, and she was knocked down brutally.”

How is it that Rush gets any sponsors at all?