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An important message from John Case, re: racial inequality and the law…

 

I received this from my friend John Case this morning and I felt it was important to pass on to you.

 

John Case <jcase4218@gmail.com> Aug 24 08:43PM  

Hello,
 
I’m going to tell you a story, then I need your help.
 
In self-defense, John McNeil, a successful African American businessman and father of two, shot and killed a Caucasian man. The deceased was a former builder who worked on John’s property and had threatened John and his son with a weapon.
 
His case should have been covered under Georgia’s Castle Doctrine, but John McNeil is sitting in jail serving a life sentence for murder.
 
John’s case is currently being reviewed in Georgia courts. We hope that the decision is a just one and that Attorney General Sam Olens does what is in his power to see that justice is served and John returns home to his family.
 
NAACP President Ben Jealous is heading to Georgia to personally deliver a petition in support of John’s case, please add your name to it today:
 
http://action.naacp.org/justice-for-john
 
John’s case is even more egregious when you consider the circumstances of his arrest. The District Attorney, who was running for re-election, brought charges 274 days after the incident. The police believed John McNeil acted in self-defense and did not commit a crime. Two officers who responded to the incident testified to this point at trial.
 
This is a clear-cut case of self-defense. Please sign the petition asking the Georgia attorney general to support justice for John McNeil:
 
http://action.naacp.org/justice-for-john
 
Thank you.

I hope you will review this and take action. Had it been a white man who exercised self-protection on his property, we would never see that man in this position.

 

Want to know where the NRA stands on shooting people like Trayvon Martin?

National Rifle Association

National Rifle Association – Our Great Protector 😦

In 2005, the NRA pushed it’s Florida members to vote to support the “Stand Your Ground” law. Now, when we’ve seen what that law can cause in the Trayvon Martin case, the National Rifle Association is now offering legal insurance for Stand Your Ground Shooters.

The insurance  covers policy holders’ costs should they become embroiled in a legal battle after shooting someone in “self-defense.” It is formally endorsed by the NRA and administered by Lockton Affinity exclusively for NRA members  (added as a rider to the “excess personal liability” plan.)

Here’s how the website advertises the added coverage for self-defense (emphasis in the original):

What’s Covered:

• Provides coverage up to the limit selected for criminal and civil defense costs.

Cost of civil suit defense is provided in addition to the limit of liability for bodily injury and property damage.

Criminal Defense Reimbursement is provided for alleged criminal actions involving self-defense when you are acquitted of such criminal charges or the charges are dropped.

And what does it cost? The basic liability plan costs either $47 or $67 annually, for coverage up to $100,000 or $250,000, respectively… PLUS a policy holder can add the self-defense insurance by paying $118 or $165 for the lesser coverage, or between $187 and $254 for the larger plan.The coverage amount stays the same.

I agree with ThinkProgress.org that Matt Bors summed it up better than anyone:

As usual, America is so lucky to have the NRA looking after our right to bear (and use) arms.

It’s over a month… why isn’t Zimmerman in custody?

According to the L.A.Times:

George Zimmerman, whose fatal shooting of an unarmed teenager has sparked nationwide protests over alleged racial profiling, had thought the entire incident would “blow over,” a friend said Sunday. Instead, Zimmerman is hiding amid death threats and demands for his arrest.

As to how anyone could think that the death of a 17-year-old armed with candy and iced tea could just disappear doesn’t realize his own failing.

Although he has some friends coming out to claim that Zimmerman is not racist, there is the problem of the 911 tape, the list of previous calls to the police from Zimmerman claiming other black people in the neighborhood (where apparently there are black residents) and the fact that Zimmerman was told to withdraw, but followed Trayvon Martin anyway.

In any other similar situation, a Zimmerman-type offender would be arrested if only to prevent his leaving Florida. Why not here?

This is not the first time that Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law has caused unnecessary death..

Trayvon Martin’s death and George Zimmerman’s lack of prosecution for the shooting is taking up much of our news. This is not, however, the only case of horrible death attributed to the Stand Your Ground law (which, by the way, was heavily promoted by the NRA to get passed… you know… the “guns don’t kill people, people kill people” guys). Here is another one:

From KSDK, Gannett Channel 5, St Louis:

Valrico, FL (CNN/WFLA/WTFS/WTSP) – Outrage over last month’s shooting death of an unarmed teen in Florida has put a new focus on the state’s “Stand Your Ground” law. The widow of a man shot dead in front of his daughter, says it is a free pass for murder.

When David James, an Iraq War veteran, escaped combat in the Middle East unscathed, his wife Kanina breathed a sigh of relief.

“I would worry about him but I thought he’d be safe here,” she said.

Kanina was wrong; and now wants to know why Trevor Dooley, a 71-year-old retired bus driver, shot her husband in broad daylight, right front of their eight-year-old daughter. Dooley claims it was self defense. Kanina James calls it murder.

“What person brings a gun to a park when there’s children? I mean, he killed my husband. He could’ve just talked to him,” James said.

Whether or not Trevor Dooley fired in self-defense is at the heart of this case. Also central to the story is Dooley’s defense-Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law-which allows a person to stand their ground and use deadly force if they fear someone could seriously harm them.

Here’s what witnesses said happened on that September Sunday in 2010. Forty-one-year-old David James was playing basketball with his daughter when witnesses said Dooley, who lived right across the street, started yelling at a teenager who was skateboarding, to get off the court. That’s when witnesses said James intervened.

James yelled back to Dooley, asking him to show where any sign said no skateboarding. Dooley then crossed the street to the park to confront James.

A tennis player at the park, Michael Whitt, testified things turned ugly when Dooley reached for his waistband. Whitt said James then lunged at Dooley. The two men struggled on the ground before James was shot once through the heart. On the 911 call, Whitt is heard trying to help.

Dooley tells a different story; one that contradicts witness statements. Dooley told authorities when he took the gun out of his right front pocket James saw the weapon and knocked him to the ground. At a hearing to get the charges dismissed, Dooley testified, “he was choking me to death.”

Dooley’s lawyer said his client turned to walk away towards home and that James was the aggressor. He said Dooley did show a gun, but did not use it until he felt his life was threatened. He said charges against his client should be dropped given the Stand Your Ground law.

Kanina James said her husband of 13 years had never been aggressive, that he was a gentle family man. She believes he was trying to protect himself and their daughter, Danielle, after he saw Dooley pull a gun.

“He loved Danielle so much, that breaks my heart, that Trevor Dooley took my daughter’s best friend away from her; she’ll never have her daddy,” Kanina James said.

Danielle’s testimony about how and why the situation turned violent is key in a case that hinges on self-defense. Danielle, now 10, recalled how her father asked Dooley where the signs were that said “no skateboarding” on the court.

“My dad got on top of him, so he could keep him down so he could get the answer,” the young girl said.

“Where were your dad’s hands?” prosecutors asked.

“On his arms.”

“On the man’s arms?”

“Yeah,” she said.

Danielle then recalled her father’s last moments.

“I think the guy pulled out the gun then,” she said.

“Did you hear anything?” said prosecutors.

“Yeah.”

“What did you hear?”

“Like when it shot?” Danielle said.

“You heard a gunshot,” said prosecutors.

“Yeah.

“Did your dad say anything then?”

“Yeah.”

“What did he say?” said prosecutors.

“Call the ambulance, I have been shot,” she said.

When Kanina James arrived at the scene, her husband was already dead and her daughter was crying, asking, “Why isn’t anyone helping my daddy?”

OK. Now you should know that other states have similar laws. Perhaps yours does?

Perhaps you should look into it.