Blog Archives

I was thinking about my own labor history…

 

Since I’ve been taking a look at unions today, it occurs to me that I have been a member of two unions back in my New York past.

As a theatre worker in the early 70s, I had experience as a member of AEA (Actors Equity Association) and LOBTET (the League of Off Broadway Theatre Employees and Technicians.) LOBTET was eaten up by Equity after a couple of years and does not exist anymore.

As an Equity member (which I had to join as a professional stage manager), I was involved in the Off Broadway strike in 1970 or 71. Equity was protesting the fact that actors in off-Broadway productions were often paid very little or nothing at all, but took jobs so that they might be seen by critics or casting direc tors or Broadway producers.

I had to picket the Theatre De Lys (now the Lucille Lortel Theatre) one night. I walked back and forth with my

Shelley Winters

picket sign, alone, while the General Manager of the theatre sat in the ticket booth and stared at me.

After a while I was joined by another Equity member, and this was one of the most interesting occurences in my theatre career. The other picketer was Shelley Winters!

Shelley and I picketed for about two hours, carrying on a neat social conversation, until we decided that it was past what would have been curtain time and we quit. She got a cab and I walked down the block to the subway.

That’s my Union Story.

 

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A personal note – I’m living in considerable fear…

Yesterday I had another seizure like the dozen or so I’ve had in the past three years. As I mentioned at the time of the accident 4 weeks ago that left me with broken ribs and shoulder blade and collarbone (and sent me to the hospital for close to a week), my fall down the stairs was caused by one of these seizures. My car accident which took away my right to drive was the result of another seizure four weeks before that.

The worst part of these seizures is that after blacking out (and falling or actually carrying out some activities), I remember nothing until I come out of it… maybe a few minutes later, but occasionally a much longer time. Those who have experienced seeing me in such a state have confirmed that I talk to them and often do things… something I have never had a memory of.

My fear now is that these seizures may start coming more frequently. I’ve been through a large number of medical tests with no results. One doctor thinks it might be epilepsy and a couple of weeks ago had me watch out and see if new seizures happened, even with prescribed medication. I’ll have to call her today and tell her it has happened… not something I look forward to.

Elly is afraid that I’ll have one while she is at work and that I will fall and hurt myself with ho one around. I fear that, too… but I’ve got to go on living somehow.

Actually, this blog is one of the things that keeps me going and for that I thank the several hundred readers who view it every day. Sorry I’ve spoken about it now… I’ll try to lay off in the future.

– Bill

If you missed this week’s Podcast, you can hear it at BlogTalk Radio…

Just go HERE.

We talked about Apple Computer‘s announcement of iCloud, the shortage of some generic medications in hospitals, the loss of memory with age, The loss of groundwater as seen from space by the GRACE project. and other things… If you sign in and listen, you can also add comments which will be available to all listeners, a list that grows every week.

btw: I’m getting a new cell phone, hopefully in the next week, which will improve the AWFUL sound quality of my current podcasts. And maybe I’ll have a music intro by next week.


– Bill

I was sorry to read of the passing of Jan Vandermarck

Back in 1967 and 1968 I knew him as founding Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.

I was a college student and was organizing my Systems Theatre company after taking Jack Burnham’s incredible Art and Systems course and then putting together what would become the Theatre Systems course that I organized as an independent study with the Engineering program under Gus Rath. One of the first things we did as a group was a computer generated movement and word piece called Space Wars.

Jan Vandermarck let us present it as an official event of the Museum and we were covered by the Chicago press (that didn’t really understand what we were doing). Jan was a real experimenter… he gave Dan Flavin his first 1 man show, showed off the several generations of great Chicago artists, and let Christo wrap the building in canvas long before the Valley Curtain.

From the NY Times:

Jan van der Marck was born on Aug. 19, 1929, in Roermond, the Netherlands, where his family owned a printing and publishing business that he was expected to join. Instead he studied art history at the University of Nijmegen, where he earned a doctorate in 1956 and placated his parents by writing his dissertation on 19th-century Belgian book illustration.

With a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, Mr. van der Marck traveled to the United States in 1957 to research the relationship between museums and their audiences.

Jan was 80.

Support Under The LobsterScope…

Hey… if I didn’t need it, I wouldn’t ask.

Doing Under The LobsterScope is my current employment (until I can find another paying job) and it takes up a lot of time. I DO enjoy  bringing you The Cartoon or Cartoons of the Week , the Quotes, the Political and Arts News, the Blogrolls to the best sites in America and beyond… They are all a joy to put together. Often we get the breaking political stories before you see them anywhere else. And the wide open communication channels developed with readers can’t be beat.

A $5.00 contribution goes a long way (so does a $1.00 contribution) and helps me keep the thing going, pays for part of my internet connection while I do the blog, and lets me know it means something to YOU.

As many of you have discovered over the last few weeks, for a contribution of $5.00 or more you will receive a copy of my Picture Font, Bill’s Cast O’ Characters (I send you the True Type versions for both Macs and PCs by email). I regularly sell this font for $29.95. Sample Below:

For the benefit of my previous supporters who might want to come in again, in March I will be putting up a new “font reward” for donors and Bill’s Cast O’ Characters will go back on the order it for $29.95 shelf. So your $5.00 (or larger) donation actually brings you a valuable product.

I really look forward to hearing from you. Just click on the “DONATE” button below.

– Bill T.

A Reward for the Supporters of Under The LobsterScope

So many of you have been following this blog since 2004 that I feel like a member of a huge web community.

I have enjoyed bringing you The Cartoon or Cartoons of the Week (this week’s pair on the recent Supreme Court decision are particularly poignant), the Quotes, the Political and Arts News, the Blogrolls to the best sites in America and beyond… They are all a joy to put together. Often we get the breaking political stories before you see them anywhere else. And our wide open communication channels with readers can’t be beat.

Well, I need YOUR help to keep it going. I’m hoping you will make a small contribution, by PayPal or credit/debit card,  in support of Under The LobsterScope. You’d be amazed at how much $5.00 can do to help me bring more and more to these pages. And it is probably the LOWEST annual subscription fee you will make to any publication… interactive or not.

And for a contribution of $5.00 or more you will receive a copy of my Picture Font, Bill’s Cast O’ Characters (I send you the True Type versions for both Macs and PCs by email). I regularly sell this font for $29.95. Sample Below:

You should know, however, that even a contribution of $1.00 adds to the ability of this unemployed blogger to find things for your benefit. By clicking on the DONATE button below, you tell me that Under The LobsterScope makes a difference in your time on the web.

Thanks,

– Bill T.