Blog Archives

Here’s a small audio project for you and your iPhone:

I found this on Boing Boing the other day and it seemed to me an awfully clever idea: How to make a sort-of speaker for your iPhone.

It uses the cardboard toilet paper roll center that we usually just throw away. You just cut a slit in the middle that’s big enough to stick your iPhone in (speakers down, of course) and when you play music or radio or podcasts it’s like having an amplifier.

Try it. It takes about five minutes, Here’s what it looks like:

Love it.

 

Apple Computer may be acquiring Twitter

 

This was on Reuters‘ web site this morning:

(Reuters) – Apple Inc (AAPL.O) held discussions in recent months about possibly investing hundreds of millions of dollars in Twitter to gain a social networking presence, the New York Times on Friday, cited people briefed on the matter as saying.

The iPhone and iPad maker, which has never delved deeply into a social media space dominated by Facebook Inc (FB.O), at one point considered an investment that would have valued the microblogging service at $10 billion but the two were not in negotiations now, the newspaper reported.

Apple declined comment. Twitter did not respond to requests for comment on the deal, which the newspaper said might presage closer ties between the two.

Let’s keep an eye on this. It could be a big deal.

 

I’ve never missed a week of blogging since I started eight years ago…

Being in the hospital is no fun whatsoever…

…but this past week my record was shattered…as was my car and (almost) me, too.

It started last Friday when I was driving down to the Apple Store in Bethesda to get the trackpad fixed on my MacBookPro. On the way I had a car accident (if you don’t mind I’ll leave out the details) which put me in the Hospital for four days. I’m OK now…a little ribcage pain where the airbag hit… and looking forward to restarting things.

My mother and sister took care of my laptop… just got it back an hour ago… and I can get back to Under The LobsterScope. At least some things work out.

There’ll be some new posts pretty soon… just give me a chance to get it together again.

– Bill

Romney Campaign Misspells “America”

iPhone supporters of Romney probably didn’t notice it, but everyone else did:

 

Talking Points Memo:

The “With Mitt” app, released by the campaign, lets users customize photos with various “Mitt-inspired” frames. “I’m With Mitt,” “American Greatness” and “Believe in America” are among the frame options.

But one stands out: “A Better Amercia” — typo and all. The misspelled word was widely mocked on Twitter after the photo frame made the rounds. An instagram user flagged the photo, and TPM verified the unfortunate typo was still a part of the app Wednesday morning.

The Romney campaign told TPM that the mistake was “corrected immediately” and submitted to Apple. “They have to approve our update,” the campaign said.

 

Yeah? The graphic above was copied less than 2 hours ago. I didn’t know Apple got that involved with designer’s apps.

Sleeping with my iPhone…

I saw a statistic that said 65% of cell phone users sleep with their phones.

Well, I’m one of them. My iPhone is next to me when I go to bed. Why? Because I like to play a podcast while I go to sleep… it only takes about 15 minutes and then the podcast turns itself off when it is over.

My favorite sleepy-time podcasts? Greg Proops‘ “Smartest Man in the World” is number one. Harry Shearer‘s “Le Show” is a close second, followed by “This American Life.” Lately, I’ve also been playing Jack Benny shows from the 30s and 40s.

I don’t know why others sleep with their cell phones… I certainly don’t expect calls overnight. If my secret of how to get to sleep with your iPhone helps anyone, then I am truly glad.

Apple does it again!

An evening revelation…

It’s been so long that I’ve seen a rainbow… but, as Elly and I pulled into the parking lot of the Mountain View Diner in Charles Town, there it was… fuzzy in the clouds as the sun behind me was beginning to set.

I took a quick photo with my iPhone:

A little out of focus, but that’s what the air felt like.

I’m having computer problems…

… which is why there was no post yesterday. I’ve been putting off replacing the motherboard on this machine since I accidentally spilled coffee on the keyboard some months ago… but now it id getting worse. When it heats up, the computer has a mind of it’s own and I lose control of either the mouse or the trackpad, making it hard to post.

Since I can’t afford repairs until January when my annual retirement check comes (bless you, TIAA-CREF), we may be having spotty postings for a couple of months (although I’ll try to borrow my wife’s laptop when she doesn’t have it at her job.)

Sorry about that… I’ve missed very few posting days since 2004.

Cartoon(s) of the Week – Variations on Experience.

Tom Toles in the Washington Post:

How well we’ve learned from experience…

– and –

Jeff Danziger in the Loas Angeles Times:

And how new experiences make us grow…

– and –

Mike Luckovich in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution:

For many, it would be nice to have someplace to go home to…

– and –

Lee Judge in the Kansas City Star:

The Banks are hiring only the best…

Outside of my regular picks for Cartoon(s) of the Week, there is one more outside the general trend that reflected my own feelings:

Kevin Siers in the Charlotte Observer:

I’ll miss you, Steve… every time I bring out my MacBook and enter the Cartoon(s). – Bill

Steve Jobs Died Today…

This has me so broken up I don’t even think I can write about it… so here is the article I first got the news from in Variety:

Steve Jobs dies at 56
Apple mogul gave Hollywood a digital distribution outlet

By DAVID S. COHEN

This is the Photo I want to remember Steve Jobs by...

Steven Jobs, the pioneering mogul who led Pixar Animation and Apple to banner success and became a leader in the computer, consumer electronics and animation industries, has died. He was 56.

Hollywood did not always agree with Jobs — there were tiffs over the pricing of music and other offerings on iTunes and over the fact that Apple rendered iTunes content unplayable on non-Apple devices. But in an environment in which huge numbers of consumers were illegally downloading music and other content from P2P file-sharing sites, the series of devices Apple introduced under Jobs — the iPod in conjunction with the iTunes Music Store, the iPhone and the iPad — made the legal (and therefore, for showbiz, at least potentially profitable) consumption of digital content possible and popular, weaning some consumers of the piracy habit.

Jobs first gained fame as one of the “two Steves” — Steve Wozniak was the other — who co-founded Apple Computer in a garage in 1976.

He lost control of the company in 1985 and saw his reputation and personal fortune dwindle over the next decade. But during that time he acquired from George Lucas’ Industrial Light & Magic, at a bargain price, a small computer-graphics unit that was quickly remonickered Pixar. Jobs put his own cash into the money-losing company long enough to see it deliver the blockbuster “Toy Story” and make him a billionaire.

In time, Disney bought Pixar, and Jobs became the Mouse House’s largest shareholder, with holdings dwarfing those of any other individual, and a member of its board. By then, he was a well-established entertainment executive, having returned to Apple and led it to market domination in a new arena: music.

Under Jobs, Apple introduced the first popular system for legal music downloading: the combination of iTunes software, the iTunes Music Store and the iPod music player. The iPod, dismissed by critics at its introduction for being too expensive, too quirky and too tied to Apple’s software, became an iconic entertainment product and transformed Apple into a key player in electronic distribution, including TV shows and movies.

Personally, Jobs was one of the corporate world’s most effective pitchmen. His appearances at trade events, especially the Macworld tradeshow in San Francisco, always clad in his trademark black mock-turtleneck shirt, were among any year’s most anticipated tech events.

Apple fans would hang on every word, waiting for the famous “One more thing…” at the end, which often signaled some astonishing new product, like the iMac or iPod.

He was famous for his ability to persuade — or bully — people into doing the impossible, or at least convince them that the impossible was possible.

Those who worked closely with him often described an abrasive, arrogant and occasionally petty leader who did not brook disagreement. Companies or people that ran afoul of him were often “Steved” — fired on the spot.

But for better or worse, Jobs commitment to high-quality, cutting-edge products made him indispensable for the companies he ran. His career resurrection after his first flameout with Apple was, as the unauthorized biography “iCon” put it, “The greatest second act in the history of business.”

Born in San Francisco and given up for adoption, Jobs was raised in the Northern California area that would eventually be called Silicon Valley, growing up around many of the future leaders of the digital revolution, including Wozniak. He entered Reed College after high school but soon left.

After traveling in India, he teamed with Wozniak in a venture to make and sell small, pre-assembled computers, something no company had ever tried before. The success of their Apple II created the personal computer industry almost from scratch, but the market came to be dominated by the cloneable IBM PC design and Microsoft’s operating system.

Apple responded in 1984 with the Macintosh, the first personal computer to successfully mass-market a graphical interface.

Even the launch of Macintosh had a hint of Jobs’ future. Ridley Scott helmed a “1984”-themed commercial touting the launch of the Mac, and the commercial became one of the legendary spots in TV history.

Jobs was forced out of Apple in 1985.

Just the next year, George Lucas — needing cash for his divorce settlement — sold the nascent Pixar to Jobs for just $10 million.

Pixar was a money pit at first, though its Renderman software became the first and most popular computer animation software. Jobs’ funds and patience were running low, but when Pixar’s “Tin Toy” won the animated short Oscar, he negotiated Pixar’s first feature deal, for “Toy Story.”

The picture opened to rapturous reviews and socko B.O. When Pixar took its stock public days later, Jobs became a billionaire.

“Toy Story” was the first in a three-picture deal with Disney and the beginning of an unprecedented run of hits from Pixar.

Jobs returned to Apple in 1997 and began a rapid turnaround. The company’s products quickly came to reflect Jobs’ personal tastes.

He loathed buttons on handheld devices, and the result was the sleek, uncluttered interface of the iPod, iPhone and iPad.

Apple’s success with iTunes and the iPod made it a major player in entertainment, but record labels chafed at Apple’s insistence on a flat 99¢ for every song. ITunes helped reduce but did not end illegal downloads, so it didn’t put vast sums in labels’ coffers. The primary beneficiary, went the complaints, was not artists or labels but Apple itself.

With Jobs in charge of Pixar and the prickly Michael Eisner running Disney, negotiations over a renewal of Pixar’s distribution deal with the mouse became highly contentious. Disney retained sequel rights to several Pixar titles, including the “Toy Story” franchise, and began developing its own “Toy Story 3” without Pixar involved. Meanwhile, in a notorious 2004 investor call, Jobs mocked Disney’s toons, singling out “Lion King 1 1/2” as “embarrassing.”

An impasse in the negotiations seemed unavoidable. Jobs wouldn’t sell Pixar for cash, and Disney wouldn’t pay what Jobs was asking.

The solution, it turned out, was for Disney essentially to pay Pixar to take over its own animation efforts.

Disney paid $7.4 billion in 2006 to merge with Pixar. Jobs acquired a 7% stake in Disney and a seat on the board but gave up his posts as Pixar chairman and CEO, and Pixar executives Ed Catmull and John Lasseter took charge of the Disney animation slate.

Jobs pulled another techno-shocker in 2007, unveiling the long-rumored Apple iPhone. With its smooth touchscreen face and media-centric design, neither of which had been anticipated by tech-watchers, the iPhone proved a game-changer for the cellular phone/PDA business, just as the iPod had been for the music business.

But Jobs’ health was beginning to fail even as his companies were achieving their greatest success yet.

He was treated for pancreatic cancer in 2004. He seemed to recover but looked gaunt in public appearances in 2007 and 2008, sparking rumors about a recurrence of cancer and even rumors of his death.

He announced late in 2008 that he had a hormonal imbalance that was causing him to lose weight, and on Jan. 14, 2009, he took a medical leave of absence from Apple. It was later revealed that he underwent a liver transplant during his leave.

He remained gaunt, however, and took another health-related leave of absence in late 2010, amid rumors his cancer had returned and he was near death.

Jobs abruptly resigned as CEO of Apple on Aug. 24, 2011, and was elected chairman of the board. He recommended Tim Cook as his successor; Cook had already been serving as Apple CEO since January, when Jobs took a third medical leave from the company, though he still made most of the major decisions at Apple.

Jobs disliked publicity about his personal relationships, which could be difficult. He found his birth parents and biological sister, the novelist Mona Simpson.

He is survived by his wife, Laurene Powell; a son; and three daughters.

Steve Jobs Leaves CEO position at Apple…

Steve Jobs announced to Apple Computer’s board of directors that he would be resigning as CEO of the company he founded.

In a letter, Jobs stated:

“I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come. I hereby resign as CEO of Apple.”

Jobs “strongly” recommended tapping Tim Cook as CEO of Apple, and asked to continue serving as chairman of the board and Apple employee, “if the board sees fit.” The board then appointed Cook to the position.

Apple went down 5 points on the Bog Board today when the word got out.

There are very nice people in the world…

Image representing iPhone as depicted in Crunc...

Grocery shopping at Martin’s in Hagerstown this afternoon, I accidentally lost my iPhone… while I was loading or unloading my shopping cart it apparently slipped out of my shirt pocket into the empty cart and I didn’t realize it.

Halfway back to Shepherdstown, I reached for my phone to check the time and it was gone. I was really upset.

I pulled the car over to the side of Interstate 81 and searched it top to bottom… went through the grocery bags… looked between the front seats. It wasn’t there.

I turned around and headed back to the Hagerstown Martin’s. I asked at the  management desk if anyone had turned in my iPhone…and lo and behold there it was.

Someone very nicely turned it in and I was extremely lucky to get it back. As my wife pointed out, back in New York or even in Hartford, I never would have seen it again.

Battling a new virus in my Mac…

The Defender Virus was bad enough, but now it looks like I’ve got a new system virus in my Mac and just searching for it and removing it is taking up hours,

Just thought I’d let you know why so little is going into the blog.

– Bill

June is turning out to be a miserable month…

Do you know the feeling when you go in to your auto mechanic‘s operation to get a headlight replaced and walk out with an estimate for over $1,000.00 worth of work or your car is going to fall apart within the next 3000 miles?

Or how about having a computer with only two weeks left on the warranty that your local repair guy couldn’t handle and he sent you to another place 60 miles away and then this guy said it would have to be shipped to Apple to have them look at it… meanwhile you’re still waiting?

Or the little part-time job you were told you’d have in June when it was presented last April just never came through?

Or that your built in depressive personality is caught up in what seems like the destruction of government, especially relating to senior citizens like you who depend on Social Security and Medicare and you don’t feel like there is anything that can be done about it?

And don’t forget, you are five weeks away from the next Social Security check and this month’s problems have already eaten up the one you got last Wednesday…

Well, that’s where I am as the month ends… and, on top of that, I’m feeling more lost and alone than usual (Cymbalta or not) and, at many times during the day, these feelings keep me frozen in one place, unable to accomplish ANYTHING.

This morning I made one or two major screwups on the radio show… thankfully Ralph Petrie called in and corrected at least one… and I left having little or no confidence in my broadcast abilities. I’m not at all sure what will happen with tomorrow’s podcast… assuming the telephone connection doesn’t screw it up like last time…I still haven’t had one episode that sounded at all good or where I would listen to me given the choice.

I have to go do the dishes before Elly gets home and I don’t feel like getting out of my recliner (I also aid I’d make a pie… yeah, sure!).

I hope July is better… at least we’ll have the Contemporary American Theatre Festival to kick it off… and I can remember how my Theatre career fizzled in the seventies.

On my older MacBook and life has slowed down…

White MacBook laptop

My regular MacBook is sitting alone on the kitchen table awaiting a call from Apple tech Services at 2:00 this afternoon. This morning I changed the case bottom on it (second one I’ve had to put on do to the “warping” problem this model has… new base was at Apple’s expense since they know they have put a less than perfect machine out here) and after I replaced it, sticking point for point on Apple’s instructions, and turned the machine on, the network wouldn’t connect. The error message was that “the Airport card is missing,” which is unusual since I didn’t touch any Airport card… just took off te old base and put on the new one.

I’M ALMOST CERTAIN THAT APPLE WILL FIND A WAY TO COST ME MONEY HERE. They always eind a way.

Meanwhile, my older book is back in service (Elly has been using it but her new MacBook Pro came in yesterday.)  Hope your day is going better than mine.

I’m not thrilled with the quality of this morning’s podcast…

… due to a lousy set of connections from AT&T (both cellphone and network). However, in replaying it (if you ignore the first minute where there seems to be no connection… stay on, however…please!), it still covers most of what I wanted to… so give a listen if you didn’t heatr it live.

Go to it HERE at BlogTalk Radio

And please come back to hear it online next Tuesday at 10 AM.   You can call in during the half hour that it’s on at 1 (661) 554-9186. I’ll be glad to discuss just about anything with you.

And tune in live next Tuesday at 10 AM by going HERE.

I’m getting really pissed off with AT&T…

We’ve been setting up our new iPhones connected to the AT&T network that we’ver been on for a couple of years now. I though it might help our calling get better, but it turns out that the problem is god damned AT&T.

Now it used to be worse… we had Verizon, whose coverage here in the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia is even worse than AT&T’s.

At certain times of day (two in the morning, for instance) I have little or no problem dialing up from cellphone using the AT&T network. However, at the height of the day, our connection dribbles off and on and has me walking all over the house to see if any of those little bars pop back up at the top of the screen.

Aside from complaining to AT&T constantly (they have done nothing to improve the situation in the last couple of years), I’m not sure what can be done. I want my iPhone. I don’t want Verizon. I want AT&T to wise up and improve the situation. If a little company like Vonage can do it, why can’t AT&T?

Wow… three hours went by as I played with my new iPhone 4…

… so, of course, I didn’t do a damn thing on the blog (even though in the back of my head I could hear the broadcast of the House arguing about cuts to one thing or another and who is doing more to preserve Medicare) as I downloaded freebie apps and tried out the silliest ones I could find… moved my favorite iTunes songs over to the iPod in the phone and called Elly in Minnesota to tell her the phones came.

I’ll bet she can’t wait until Sunday to get back and play with hers.

At least the Podcast next Tuesday will have much better sound quality (and I finally found a music intro…a little snip from Offenbach) for those of you who tune in.

If you missed this week’s Podcast, you can hear it at BlogTalk Radio…

Just go HERE.

We talked about Apple Computer‘s announcement of iCloud, the shortage of some generic medications in hospitals, the loss of memory with age, The loss of groundwater as seen from space by the GRACE project. and other things… If you sign in and listen, you can also add comments which will be available to all listeners, a list that grows every week.

btw: I’m getting a new cell phone, hopefully in the next week, which will improve the AWFUL sound quality of my current podcasts. And maybe I’ll have a music intro by next week.


– Bill

Al Franken vs. Steve Jobs: Why are you tracking our locations?

Your iPhone may be tracking your every move and Senator Al Franken, with Congressman Ed Markey, has set out to do something about it.

From HuffPo:

Researchers found that iPhones and iPads track and record users’ locations by latitude and longitude, sometimes hundreds of times a day, for up to a year, storing the file in an unencrypted format on the device.

Franken highlights some of the potential dangers of this system, noting someone in possession of a stolen iPhone or iPad could “easily download and map out a customer’s precise movements for months at a time.” The senator also points out that there’s no indication the software can tell the difference between minors and adults meaning that “the millions of children and teenagers who use iPhone or iPad devices also risk having their location collected and compromised.”

I’m going to reproduce Franken’s letter to Apple Chairman Steve Jobs here:

Mr. Steve Jobs
1 Infinite Loop
Cupertino, CA 90514

Dear Mr. Jobs, 

Sen. Al Franken

I read with concern a recent report by security researchers that Apple’s iOS 4 operating system is secretly compiling its customers’ location data in a file stored on iPhones, 3G iPads, and every computer that users used to “sync” their devices. According to the researchers, this file contains consumers’ latitude and longitude for every day they used an iPhone or 3G iPad running the iOS 4 operating system-sometimes logging their precise geo-location up to 100 times a day. The researchers who discovered this file found that it contained up to a year’s worth of data, starting from the day they installed the iOS 4 operating system. What is even more worrisome is that this file is stored in an unencrypted format on customers’ iPads, iPhones, and every computer a customer has used to back up his or her information. See Alasdair Allen & Pete Warden, Got an iPhone or 3G iPad? Apple is Recording Your Moves (Apr. 20, 2011), available at http://radar.oreilly.com/2011/04/apple-location-tracking.html. 

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The existence of this information stored in an unencrypted format-raises serious privacy concerns. The researchers who uncovered this file speculated that it generated location based on cell phone triangulation technology. If that is indeed the case, the location available in this file is likely accurate to 50 meters or less. See Testimony of Michael Amarosa, Before the House Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, June 24, 2010 at page 7 available at http://judiciary.house.gov/hearings/pdf/Amarosa100624.pdf. Anyone who gains access to this single file could likely determine the location of a user’s home, the businesses he frequents, the doctors he visits, the schools his children attend, and the trips he has taken-over the past months or even a year. Cf: People v. Weaver, 909 N.E.2d 1195, 1199- 1200 (N.Y. 2009) (“What this technology yields and records with breathtaking quality and quantity is a highly detailed profile, not simply of where we go, but by easy inference, of our associations … and of the pattern of our professional and avocational pursuits.”). 

Moreover, because this data is stored in multiple locations in an unencrypted format, there are various ways that third parties could gain access to this file. Anyone who finds a lost or stolen iPhone or iPad or who has access to any computer used to sync one of these devices could easily download and map out a customer’s precise movements for months at a time. It is also entirely conceivable that malicious persons may create viruses to access this data from customers’ iPhones, iPads, and desktop and laptop computers. There are numerous ways in which this information could be abused by criminals and bad actors. Furthermore, there is no indication that this file is any different for underage iPhone or iPad users, meaning that the millions of children and teenagers who use iPhone or iPad devices also risk having their locationcollected and compromised. An estimated 13% of the 108 million iPhones and 19 million iPad devices sold are used by individuals under the age of 18, although some of these devices may not have been upgraded to iOS4. See AdMob, Admob Mobile Metrics Report at 5 (Jan. 2010), available at htt://metrics.admob.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/AdMob-Mobile-Metrics-Jan-10.pdf; Complaint of Apple Inc. v. Samsung Electronics CV-11-1846 at 4-5 (N.D. Cal. Apr. 15, 2011).

These developments raise several questions:

  1. Why does Apple collect and compile this location data? Why did Apple choose to initiate tracking this data in its iOS 4 operating system?
  2. Does Apple collect and compile this location data for laptops?
  3. How is this data generated? (GPS, cell tower triangulation, WiFi triangulation, etc.)
  4. How frequently is a user’s location recorded? What triggers the creation of a record of someone’s location?
  5. How precise is this location data? Can it track a user’s location to 50 meters, 100 meter, etc.?
  6. Why is this data not encrypted? What steps will Apple take to encrypt this data?
  7. Why were Apple consumers never affiamtely informed of the collection and retention of their location data in this manner? Why did Apple not seek affirmative consent before doing so?
  8. Does Apple believe that this conduct is permissible under the terms of its privacy policy? See Apple Privacy Policy at “Location-based Services” (accessed on April 20, 2011), available at www.apple.com/privacy.
  9. To whom, if anyone, including Apple, has this data been disclosed. When and why were these disclosures made?

I would appreciate your prompt response to these questions and thank you for your attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

Al Franken

United States Senator

So the next time you make a call on your iPhone or bring up the web on your iPad, you should realize that you are not alone. And, by the way, if you thought you were beating the location cache problem by buying an Android device, you should be aware that they have been found to cache location data in a similar manner.
Gotcha!

Cheers for Steve Jobs…

…who appeared today unexpectedly (he’s on medical absence at Apple) to present the new iPad.

Steve said:

“We’ve been working on this product for a while and I didn’t want to miss today.”

…and I, for one, am glad he didn’t.

Black Friday

OK… this is the big shopping day beginning the Christmas Season and Elly and I are off to visit my mother in Manassas. On the way we are going to stop at the Apple Store at Tyson’s Corner and take a look at IPhones, which Elly wants to move up to (so do I).

I’m waiting for her to get back from a morning appointment so we can leave… meanwhile I’ve been browsing the Apple Store on line… turns out that today is the only sale event they are having all year (Apple never does “sales”… they cut the prices of things when new models come out. Today is different.)

What I don’t understand is what the real costs are through AT&T… even though we currently get our cellphone service from them. I see so many things quoted on the net I don’t know what to think. Perhaps today we’ll get everything straightened out.

Saturday Nite…

Elly is at a movie with her friend Joan and I’m home with the dogs baking a recipe I found on line: Death By Apple Pie. It doesn’t look like an ordinary apple pie (it has a non-rolled out crust that doesn’t meet at the edges and a lot of apple shows through the holes.

Pretty soon (about 15 minutes) it will be done and I’ve just finished cleaning up all the dishes from the last couple of days. I’m hoping to get everything straightened out before 2 episodes of Doc Martin are on Public Television and I can sit back and watch.

My dogs are lying around sleeping now…but they’ll want their “evening shorty,” which is their nighttime walk, when my wife gets home. Right now they don’t want to be bothered with toys or anything else (although Nestle will jump up when I take the pie out of the oven… just the presence of food triggers his 11-year-old snoot into thinking he’s about to get more to eat.

I’ve avoided the political blogs all day (although I did post my Cartoon(s) of the Week which I had been building up since last Sunday.) Perhaps I’ll get back to politics tomorrow, but it was nice taking a break today.

OK…just took Death By Apple Pie out of the oven and it has to sit and cool off… it looks a lot like the picture that was on the recipe (except that I used whole wheat flour on the crust because it’s what I had in the house…we use very little white, all-purpose flour) and it smells great.

Anyway, I hope everyone has a nice evening. I know I will.

Today was release day for Apple’s iPad… looks like 150,000 sold so far

That doesn’t seem like a lot to me somehow. Then again, using Easter weekend as the sales time might not have been the best move (100,000 of the iPads were actually pre-ordered, so the day only sales are even lower than expected).

Well, I don’t have one… and, as I sit here entering this on my MacBook, I don’t think I will be likely to get one in the near future. I have seen neither the need nor the affordability to make it a go.

Let’s give it some time, though. After all, I still can’t afford an iPhone.

________________

UPDATE:

CBS Sunday Morning said 700,000 sold. Don’t have a source for those figures however.

As I predicted… here’s what meets you at the top of the NY Times Web Site…

And there’s Steve Jobs with the new “iPad”. BTW, when I went here at 4:25 PM, there was nothing at the top of the Times page about Pelosi saying she could bring in the House on the Senate’s Health Care Bill.

Cheers for independent blogs!

clipped from www.nytimes.com

Apple’s chief executive, Steven P. Jobs, introduced the iPad on Wednesday in San Francisco.


Apple Reveals the iPad Tablet

Steven P. Jobs said the new iPhone-like tablet computer, starting at $499, is prime for video, music and e-books.

blog it